Jana On Camera

Hollywood stars interviews and movie news


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Disney’s BEAUTY AND THE BEAST on Digital HD and Blu-ray is available

image001Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, the live-action adaptation of the studio’s animated classic, brought the story and characters audiences know and love to spectacular life and broke box-office records. Now the stunning, cinematic event arrives home today, June 6, on Digital HD, Blu-ray™, Disney Movies Anywhere, DVD and On-Demand.

 

The fans will be able to watch the movie with three different versions: the original theatrical cut, the premiere cut with overture, and a musical experience with a sing-along version. The release invites us to get up close and personal with the filmmakers and cast to see how this beloved animated film was transformed into a new live-action classic, from the first enchanted table read to a fascinating look at how the film was brought to life utilizing lavish sets, elaborately designed costumes and props, and state-of the-art technology. A feature on the amazing women behind the enchanted tale hosted by Emma Watson; and over 10 minutes of deleted scenes along with musical extras, including the “Beauty and the Beast” music video starring Ariana Grande and John Legend, Celine Dion’s heartfelt take on the new song “How Does a Moment Last Forever,” and jump directly to all you favorite unforgettable songs.

These clips below give you a glimpse into the design of Belle’s famous golden gown and  the dance sequences from the movie.

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PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES – WORLD PREMIERE

The World Premiere of Disney and Jerry Bruckheimer Films Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales was held in Shanghai, China, at Shanghai Disney Resort, today, May 11, marking the first time a Hollywood movie premiered in Mainland China. Actors Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, Geoffrey Rush, Javier Bardem, Brenton Thwaites, Directors Joachim Rønning and Espen Sandberg, and producer Jerry Bruckheimer attended the event.

The red-carpet event took place in Disneytown at the Shanghai Disney Resort and the screening was at the Walt Disney Grand Theatre at Disneytown.

Shanghai Disney Resort is also home to Shanghai Disneyland, featuring Treasure Cove, the first pirate-themed land at a Disney park, inspired by the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise.

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales sails to theaters in 3D on May 26!!!

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(Photos Credit: @Disney)

Johnny Depp returns to the big screen as the iconic, swashbuckling anti-hero Jack Sparrow in the all-new Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, a rip-roaring adventure that finds down-on-his-luck Captain Jack feeling the winds of ill-fortune blowing strongly his way when deadly ghost sailors, led by the terrifying Captain Salazar, escape from the Devil’s Triangle bent on killing every pirate at sea—notably Jack.

 


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Pete’s Dragon: Interview with Robert Redford

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Courtesy of Walt Disney Studios

Everybody knows Robert Redford is a legend and gas starred in some of the most iconic movies Hollywood ever made. His acting credits include Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Sting, All Is Lost, Truth, Out of Africa just to name a few. Robert produced and starred in All the President’s Men, directed Oscar winning Ordinary People and The Horse Whisperer.

I had the pleasure of sitting down with this legend, along with select reporters, at a roundtable interview last week. We discussed his work as environmentalist Meacham in the new Pete’s Dragon, the message of the movie, the Sundance, and what it was like working with the remainder of the cast.

You are a legend and have done so many cool things. Have you approached this character to make him unique?

First of all, the director David Lowery came to me and he allowed me to step in and develop the character further than it was written. So that allowed me to sort of take responsibility for the character and have a little bit of authorship. My whole thing about the character was that he was a storyteller. Storytelling was a big part of my life growing up here in Los Angeles. It was a very difficult time, difficult life, lower working class neighborhood, people didn’t have much. So storytelling became a huge thing, became a way out of a tough situation. And that played a big role in my life as a kid. I believed in making stories up. I believed in not telling stories that were already written. I think that using your imagination in a fresh new way is good – it’s good exercise. Also, it’s fun to do. You stop and think, ‘Gee, I think I’m going to tell a story and I’m just going to make it up as I go.’ It was just something I enjoyed. It also exercised my mind.

I thought, ‘Here’s a story that really is [about] storytelling and involves fantasy and realism together. Lowery has combined reality and magic in one thing, he’s put them together. When I read the script I thought, ‘well, this reminds me of my childhood with Disney movies that I saw and how much I loved that when I was a little kid: ‘Bambi,’ ‘Fantasia,’ things like that. Lowery has brought these two things together, and what I love about it is that it’s created a kind of atmosphere of magic. I think magic was such a part of my life when I was young – that was your hope factor. And what Lowery did with the character, when I first read it I said, ‘well, that’s a nice idea for a movie,’ but the character was… I felt he was underdrawn. And he opened it up and said, ‘Look, why don’t you step in and be part of the development of this character. So he allowed me to step in and work on the character. And then things changed, I felt like I was part of things and I felt like what could be developed was more of him the storyteller, and more of him trying to see things beyond what you see in front of you. He tells his daughter, ‘You only see what’s in front of you. But there’s other stuff. Look around. Look beyond.’ I liked that concept a lot. So, him opening that up and developing it a little bit with me was a pleasure.

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©Disney Enterprises. CR: Matt Klitscher.

What is it like to shift between working as a director to working as an actor under another director?

It’s sometimes hard, sometimes it’s easy. In this case, it was easier because this is not a subject I probably would have gotten involved with as a director. This is all new terrain, and Lowery had quite a grip on it. He had spent a lot of time on it. He had developed quite a storyboard about filming it. And so I was free to just be an actor. Other times, if it’s a more serious situation, where I’ve been before, you just have to turn something off, because it’s not fair to the director. To be directing yourself while you’re acting, it’s just not a good thing. So you have to turn the switch off and say I’m just here as an actor.

How is it working with young actors Oakes Fegley and Oona Laurence and the young actors in New Zealand?

The kids were very different from the usual child actors. When you have kids that are that age– anywhere from eight to thirteen, if they’re Hollywood kids, you feel that. There’s something slightly artificial, slightly overdone. These kids were just themselves. They were just absolutely who they were. And they just brought that to the table– they didn’t bring any other stuff other than who they were as kids. And they were unspoiled, they were fun, they were wide-eyed, they were really interested. And they were only interested in me in terms of how well I was telling my story. So as a result, when you see the film, you’ll feel that with these kids, they’re just real.

Bryce Dallas Howard is Grace and Robert Redford is Mr. Meacham in Disney's PETE'S DRAGON, the adventure of a boy named Pete and his best friend Elliot, who just happens to be a dragon.

Bryce Dallas Howard is Grace and Robert Redford is Mr. Meacham ©Disney Enterprises. CR: Matt Klitscher.

How was it working with Bryce Dallas Howard who plays his daughter Grace?

She’s just a delight. She’s not only talented, but she just beams, she has such a life force, it’s just a pleasure to work with her. Really fun. We had a great time.

Can you talk a little bit about the independent films vs. blockbuster films?

The Festival was misconstrued for many years: it was seen as an insurgent move. That we were in the hills of Utah, developing independent films, coming over to take the industry. Never so. It was simply meant to add on – that the Hollywood industry was beginning to become more centralized in terms of the product it was making, which is fine. But they were going to spend less time on making the more humanistic kinds of films that they made in the 70s, when they controlled both. They were separating themselves out and just following the money, which is the big blockbuster films. And so you had ‘Superman’ and ‘Batman’ and all that, and that was fine. But I felt it shouldn’t be at the expense of more humanistic stories. So starting Sundance was just meant to add on something that was being lost. That’s all. And so as a result, I think what you have now, is both. Particularly with this film. This film really does combine reality and fantasy in an interesting way. I think you need both, to keep going. You need both. If you ever shrink yourself down too much, something will start to die.

Bryce Dallas Howard is Grace, Robert Redford is Mr. Meacham and Oona Laurence is Natalie in Disney's PETE'S DRAGON, the adventure of an orphaned boy and his best friend Elliott, who just so happens to be a dragon.

Bryce Dallas Howard is Grace, Robert Redford is Mr. Meacham and Oona Laurence is Natalie ©Disney Enterprises. CR: Matt Klitscher.

You already did a lot of projects. Is there any genre or project you would like to do or developed that you didn’t do yet?

Well, I would like to do a musical! I wanted to do that for a long time. The best is always something new is coming along. I’m always attracted to do something different.

Were you familiar with the original Pete’s Dragon movie?

I never read the book, never saw the other film. I didn’t know anything about it. My kids did, but I didn’t know a thing about it. So for me it was just a brand new story, and people were saying, ‘Oh, I see you’re doing ‘Pete’s Dragon.’ It was all fresh to me. There was no history for me. We don’t make movies like this anymore. We really don’t. We’ve become so dark, and so realistic, and we’re reflecting the culture around us, which is getting more violent. Films like this are very rare, so I love being able to be in a film like this that brings something back that used to be a lot more.

What message do you hope children will take out of this version of Pete’s Dragon?

The value of magic. Keeping magic alive. I think it’s important. What I loved about the reality of the dragon in the movie is that it’s up to speculation, for the audience to decide what they believed or what they didn’t believe.

 

Disney’s Pete’s Dragon is now playing!!!

For years, old wood carver Mr. Meacham, played by Robert Redford, has delighted local children with his tales of the fierce dragon that resides deep in the woods of the Pacific Northwest. To his daughter, Grace, played by Bryce Dallas Howard, who works as a forest ranger, these stories are little more than tall tales…until she meets Pete, portrayed by Oakes Fegley. Pete is a mysterious 10-year-old with no family and no home who claims to live in the woods with a giant, green dragon named Elliott. And from Pete’s descriptions, Elliott seems remarkably similar to the dragon from Mr. Meacham’s stories. With the help of Natalie, an 11-year-old girl whose father Jack owns the local lumber mill, Grace sets out to determine where Pete came from, where he belongs, and the truth about this dragon. The film also stars Oona Lawrence, Wes Bentley, karl Urban, and more.


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Pete’s Dragon: Interview with Bryce Dallas Howard

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Bryce Dallas Howard as Grace ©Disney Enterprises. CR: Matt Klitscher.

Bryce Dallas Howard is not just a good actress, she is funny and has a wonderful energy as you would imagine. Her first role was in M. Night Shyamalan’s thriller The Village, proving she had the acting ready to stay and be successful.

A couple of years later, Bryce has some leading roles and big action blockbuster movies on her list. And, this time around, she will come face-to-face with another giant reptile in Disney’s Pete’s Dragon, a reimagining of the 1977 cherished family film, a adventure of an orphaned boy named Pete and his best friend Elliott, who just so happens to be a dragon.

I had the pleasure of sitting down with this talented actress, along with select reporters, at a roundtable interview last week. We discussed her work as park ranger Grace in the new Pete’s Dragon, her love of the original, what it like to act with different reptiles, and what it was like working with the remainder of the cast.

How was it about this project that got your attention? What attracted you to this project?

It’s a children’s film and this is the first I will be able to play a mother. I just saw it a couple of days ago. I had seen an older cut, but I saw the final version a couple days ago with my husband, and it was very emotional for me, seeing me in a mom role. My husband gave me this really good advice early, because I kept saying, ‘I don’t want to overcomplicate things because this is a children’s film. Whenever I was a kid and I would watch children’s films and it would get to a scene with two adults talking, I would just be like, ‘Just get to the dragon!’ Like, ‘Where’s the dragon?’ And so that was something that I was kind of aware of. I was like, ‘Who is this woman? What is she like?’ and [my husband said,] ‘It’s really simple, babe. You are with Pete the way that you are with the kids.’ Like, ‘This is her son. We don’t realize that when they first meet each other but this is her son. And she’s going to be his mother. So that’s how you should speak to him.

What is the biggest difference between Jurassic World and Pete’s Dragon?

It was hilarious, because I made this pretty soon– only a few months– after I finished ‘Jurassic World,’ and I kept messing up. Like, when I was on set, I would just be like, ‘Okay so, where’s the raptor? Where’s the dinosaur?’ And then I’m like, ‘Oh.. dragon!’ And now I’m sure we’re going to be shooting the next ‘Jurassic’ and I’ll probably be referring to them as dragons. But in my mind they were two very different films, obviously, and the tones are really different. I think for this one, the thing that I just kept thinking about or considering was Disney’s canon of work, the Disney legacy, and how Disney has been of service to children because of the kinds of stories that they tell. That was something that I was really cognizant of, whereas obviously with ‘Jurassic World,’ it’s the legacy of Michael Crichton, and of Steven Spielberg. You want to honor their legacy. You need to be aware of that because that brand represents something.

Speaking of that, I read that Pete’s Dragon was one of your favorite movie as a child.

Yeah!

Comparing that film to this one…

Which you can’t!

Is there anything from the original film that you see in this one that pays homage to the original?

I think there were really no throwbacks, intentionally, other than what was at the genesis of this idea, which is that it’s about a boy who’s orphaned whose family, in essence, is a dragon. It’s his best friend. And no one believes that that dragon exists, and then we come to see that magic is actually possible. It’s a story about what it takes to find your family. And I think that that, thematically, is obviously very similar to the first film, but this really was original. It’s not even like, ‘inspired by.’ It’s really an original film; it’s not meant to step on the memories of the 1977 version of ‘Pete’s Dragon.’ I think, for all of us, that’s going to be the tricky thing in introducing this movie to folks. How do we mention the original but also ensure that it doesn’t become all about that, because it’s meant to be something that’s complementary, but it is something that’s stand-alone.

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©Disney Enterprises. CR: Matt Klitscher

Can you talk a little bit more about acting in opposite of something that is not there which you’ve done a bunch of times?

The technology is changing so rapidly. There were even different things [developed] between shooting ‘Jurassic World’ and this, that were simply different techniques and ways to create that realism on set while also making sure that everybody got what they needed in order to build this fantastical creature in post using visual effects. What we had, was– you know those jumpy castles, how it’s just plastic and then you blow them up and it something? We had the equivalent of that for a dragon. So we had a big, fifteen-foot-tall blown-up version of Elliot, that would only take like five minutes to blow up. And so in a lot of the scenes, in particular where Oakes was there, or Oona was there, we would have the dragon there, just as a reference point, so we wouldn’t have to be constantly saying, ‘Wait, is it that leaf that we’re looking at or that one over there?’ and that was enormously helpful.

Did you get to see any images of Elliot to help during the shooting process?

Yes! We shot this in New Zealand. And before we started shooting, David Lowery and Jim Whitaker the producer arranged for us to go to Peter Jackson’s screening room and see what Weta was doing with Elliot, so that we could know, like, that he was furry. He didn’t have scales. Stuff like that. And to get a sense of his playfulness, and that he kind of looked like a big puppy dog. That was important so that we had a sense of what he was going to be like. This really weird, kind of magical thing happens where obviously, when you’re on set, you’re pretending and you’re not seeing anybody, but then I saw the film a couple days ago, and now all of a sudden, all my memories of shooting [are] exactly what I saw in the movie. Anyway, that’s like my whole job. [Playing pretend is] my entire job.”

How was it working with Oakes and Oona?

They’re awesome. They’re the best. I mean, I feel like they say, ‘Don’t work with children and animals.’ Yes, maybe sometimes [with] animals it’s a little unpredictable, but every experience that I’ve had working with kids has been so calm and relaxed and focused and inspiring. And these kids in particular, they’re like not kids. Many times, I would ask Oakes and Oona for advice, like if I was trying to figure something out, I’d just be like, ‘Guys, what should I do?’ And they would always have the best suggestions. And Oakes is going to be a little filmmaker. And Oona’s going to be president, so that’s awesome.

Bryce Dallas Howard is Grace and Oakes Fegley is Pete in Disney's PETE'S DRAGON. ©Disney Enterprises. CR: Matt Klitscher.

Bryce Dallas Howard is Grace and Oakes Fegley is Pete in Disney’s PETE’S DRAGON. ©Disney Enterprises. CR: Matt Klitscher.

What was the reaction of you family and friends when you were cast in this movie?

My sister cried, because we were so into the original ‘Pete’s Dragon.’ And then it was that kind of complicated moment where I’m like, ‘Well, but it’s not a remake. It’s a reimagining. Let me describe what a reimagining is and what it is not. But I really wonder what it’s going to be for my kids’ generation, because I think for us we love the original movie. And the original movie, I feel like it [has] a little bit of a cult following; it’s not like it was super mainstream. But all of us that had the ratty-tatty VHS copy, we were really into it. So I think that it will be really interesting to see the two different perceptions of it.

Do you turn to your dad for advice?

Yes and no. Sometimes. I always forget to have officials conversations with him like can you teach me about something. He thought me one thing that was very helpful that I still struggle to understand, he sat down and explained to me about ‘crossing the line’ on filmmaking. He mostly gives excellent advices with family and raising kids. He has a unique insight into that.

How was it like to be working with Robert Redford?

It’s crazy, because he’s like this regular, very cool, awesome guy, that you would want to work with every single day. And it’s a relaxing experience. It’s not intimidating. But then there’s this other side, where you’re like, ‘You’re the greatest entertainment entrepreneur of all time. You created Sundance and you’re an iconic actor and director and producer.’ He’s an exceptional human being, and so it’s this huge privilege to be in his presence, but then he’s also a cool dude to chill with, as well.

 

Disney’s Pete’s Dragon opens tomorrow, August 12, 2016.

For years, old wood carver Mr. Meacham, played by Robert Redford, has delighted local children with his tales of the fierce dragon that resides deep in the woods of the Pacific Northwest. To his daughter, Grace, played by Bryce Dallas Howard, who works as a forest ranger, these stories are little more than tall tales…until she meets Pete, portrayed by Oakes Fegley. Pete is a mysterious 10-year-old with no family and no home who claims to live in the woods with a giant, green dragon named Elliott. And from Pete’s descriptions, Elliott seems remarkably similar to the dragon from Mr. Meacham’s stories. With the help of Natalie , an 11-year-old girl whose father Jack owns the local lumber mill, Grace sets out to determine where Pete came from, where he belongs, and the truth about this dragon. The film also stars Oona Lawrence, Wes Bentley, karl Urban, and more.


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Spielberg, Rylance, Barnhill and Wilton chatted about The BFG

the-bfg-posterThe Disney animation The BFG (abbreviation of Big Friendly Giant) directed by Steven Spielberg, is based on the 1982 classic by Roald Dahl and tells the story of an orphan, Sophie, played by newcomer Ruby Barnhill, who finds a giant whom she calls BFG, played by Oscar winner Mark Rylance. He takes her to the Giants Country, where she discovers what he does for a living, that he is the smallest giant, and the joy of having a BIG friend.

Now, think Disney, Steven Spielberg and Roald Dahl, I can’t think the best and creative mix of essential ingredients to surely result in a successful box office. This is the first film that the acclaimed filmmaker makes with the studio.

Some journalists, including myself, recently had the chance to talk to Steven Spielberg, Ruby Barnhill, Mark Rylance and Penelope Wilton on roundtables during the press day to promote this new release. They gave us the scoop on the main roles, advances in technology that made the movie possible, the cast on the set, and the first fart scene directed by Spielberg. Here are some facts I got. Let’s check out them out.

Technology

Steven Spielberg spoke about technology and finding the balance between effects and the heart of the film. “Well, I think that the whole nature of my approach to The BFG was to be able to do both. Was to be able to use technology to advance the heart and create a flawless transposition between the genius of Mark Rylance to the genius of WETA, as they were able to digitally translate Mark’s soul on film in the character of The BFG. And so all the work we did was to get back to basics. I knew Mark was going to really knock this out of the ballpark, but I didn’t want the ball to land at the end of a motion-capture volume. I wanted the ball to land in the lap of the audience. I think WETA paid more careful attention to how to preserve what Mark had given us on the day. Their artists did an amazing job translating Mark. There’s about 95 percent of what Mark gave me and Ruby on the screen now. And that’s because technology today allowed us to do it. Five years ago, we could not have made BFG this way.”

Director Steven Spielberg, actress Ruby Barnhill and actor Mark Rylance arrive on the red carpet for the US premiere of Disney's "The BFG," directed and produced by Steven Spielberg. A giant sized crowd lined the streets of Hollywood Boulevard to see stars arrive at the El Capitan Theatre. "The BFG" opens in U.S. theaters on July 1, 2016, the year that marks the 100th anniversary of Dahl's birth, at the El Capitan Theatre on June 21, 2016 in Hollywood, California.  (Photo by Jesse Grant/Getty Images for Disney) *** Local Caption *** Steven Spielberg; Ruby Barnhill; Mark Rylance

Director Steven Spielberg, actress Ruby Barnhill and actor Mark Rylance.  (Photo by Jesse Grant/Getty Images for Disney) 

Story

“What really appealed to me was the fact that the protagonist was a girl. Not a boy. And it was a really strong girl. And the protagonist was going to allow us at a certain point to believe that four feet tall can completely outrank a twenty-five feet giant. I got very excited that this was going to be a little girl’s story and that her courage and her values were going to, in a way, turn the Cowardly Lion into the brave hero at the end, which is what she turns The BFG into”, said Spielberg.

Casting Barnhill

“When I saw Ruby’s reading I went crazy because I’d been looking for over half a year—actually longer. Over eight months I’d been looking,” Spielberg said. He flew her to Berlin where they were finalizing shooting for Bridge of Spies and had her speak to his wife Kate Capshaw first. (Side note: he’s seen about 150 casting tapes from all over the world at that point, and he and Capshaw had agreed that they had to meet Barnhill).

HOLLYWOOD, CA - JUNE 21:  Actress Ruby Barnhill arrives on the red carpet for the US premiere of Disney's "The BFG," directed and produced by Steven Spielberg. A giant sized crowd lined the streets of Hollywood Boulevard to see stars arrive at the El Capitan Theatre. "The BFG" opens in U.S. theaters on July 1, 2016, the year that marks the 100th anniversary of Dahl's birth, at the El Capitan Theatre on June 21, 2016 in Hollywood, California.  (Photo by Jesse Grant/Getty Images for Disney) *** Local Caption *** Ruby Barnhill

Actress Ruby Barnhill arrives on the red carpet for the US premiere of Disney’s “The BFG” (Photo by Jesse Grant/Getty Images for Disney)

Motion-capture character

The Oscar winner Mark Rylance told us about his first motion-capture character. “I had no idea what this would look like and I thought a lot about whether or not I should ask Steven whether I should be involved in the input, but I thought, he’ll know what’s right.”

Rylance added, “I tried to, but they’re all so busy. I tried to get through to Andy Serkis, but it’s obviously such a big thing right now that he’s so busy. Even his friend, who was trying to get through to him for me… said, ‘He never calls me back!’”

Rylance also explained how much she wanted Barnhill to be on set with him. “She makes me laugh and moves me in a totally different way. The film is about a kind of friendship between these two. I think we should always be together. So he did that. From then on we always worked together… in the afternoons we’d go to her set next door—this table would be much larger than this room. And these props would be six foot high, and there she’d be, standing in scale. And now the camera would be there…and I’d be up a high tower…to get the eyesight.”

Fart scene, filming the whizzpopper scene

When asked about the scene, Spielberg laughed and said, “Yeah, it took me a long time. I don’t know. I guess I’m kind of modest when it comes to flatulence. Except when it’s being done by either giants or corgis. I’ve gotten over my modesty.”

Penelope Wilton added, “It was hard work, that scene, because each of us had to do our own take on the farting… mine went on forever! I can’t think why—he never said ‘cut’ for ages! At the end, I was practically pink in the face!”

HOLLYWOOD, CA - JUNE 21:  Actress Penelope Wilton arrives on the red carpet for the US premiere of Disney's "The BFG," directed and produced by Steven Spielberg. A giant sized crowd lined the streets of Hollywood Boulevard to see stars arrive at the El Capitan Theatre. "The BFG" opens in U.S. theaters on July 1, 2016, the year that marks the 100th anniversary of Dahl's birth, at the El Capitan Theatre on June 21, 2016 in Hollywood, California.  (Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for Disney) *** Local Caption *** Penelope Wilton

Actress Penelope Wilton (Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for Disney)

The film also stars Jermaine Clement, Rebecca Hall, Bill Hader and Rafe Spall. It was written by Melissa Mathison who passed away last November and features a score from John Williams.

HOLLYWOOD, CA - JUNE 21:  Composer John Williams (L) and director Steven Spielberg arrive on the red carpet for the US premiere of Disney's "The BFG," directed and produced by Steven Spielberg. A giant sized crowd lined the streets of Hollywood Boulevard to see stars arrive at the El Capitan Theatre. "The BFG" opens in U.S. theaters on July 1, 2016, the year that marks the 100th anniversary of Dahl's birth, at the El Capitan Theatre on June 21, 2016 in Hollywood, California.  (Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for Disney) *** Local Caption *** John Williams; Steven Spielberg

Composer John Williams (L) and director Steven Spielberg (Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for Disney)

 

The BFG is now playing! #TheBFG

 

On a side note – About Meeting and being in the same room as Steven Spielberg: What can I say? Sitting down with him and newcomer actress Ruby Barnhill last week during the press day, I found myself in the rare position of being somewhat at a loss for words, nervous, emotional…never felt that way before, he is a genius! The acclaimed director is one of the warmest and welcoming person I’ve ever met, especially for someone whose work has been such a huge part of our daily lives and don’t forget to mention his success The roundtable was casual, free and caring. I was not able to take his pictures or one with him, but I have that image right here in mind for the rest of live.

 


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Celebrating 100 years of Roald Dahl

Roald Dahl (1916 – 2016) – 100th Anniversary

These are the wonderful works of Roald Dahl that have made it to the big screen. Everything from WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY and THE WITCHES to MATILDA and JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH! Let’s check it out the movie poster.

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Charlie

Matilda

James and The Giant Peach

fantastic_mr_fox

The Witches

willy_wonka_and_the_chocolate_factory

 

The talents of three of the world’s greatest storytellers – Roald Dahl, Walt Disney and Steven Spielberg – finally unite to bring Dahl’s beloved classic The BFG to life. Directed by Spielberg, Disney’s “The BFG” tells the imaginative story of a young girl and the Giant who introduces her to the wonders and perils of Giant Country.

The BFG opens in theaters July 1st.

 


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Zootopia DVD is now available!

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On June7th, Walt Disney Home Entertainment released ZOOTOPIA on Digital HD, Blu-ray™, Disney Movies Anywhere, DVD and On-Demand, which does not include bonus. ZOOTOPIA is a comedy-adventure that has broken records worldwide earning more than $900 million at the global box office to date! I had the chance to sit down with directors Rich Moore and Byron Howard, Raymond S. Persi who voiced the sloth FLASH, and Hispanic animator Jorge E. Ruiz Cano, to talk about the vibrant world of ZOOTOPIA, their roles on this production, the bonus features offerings, and much more. #Zootopia

Check it out the videos: